Water consumption is one of Piaggio’s main areas of focus and it has taken concrete action to implement its Policy of trying to reduce the consumption of energy and natural resources. Piaggio has consistently worked on this, as is shown by analysing the water consumption of Pontedera plant, which in a decade has more than halved its m³ consumption of well water. This reduction was mainly made possible by plant upgrades (e.g. inverters on well pumps) and in more recent times by replacing less efficient systems with latest generation technologies (e.g. new 2R painting and new cataphoresis).

The Baramati and Vinh Phuc plants reuse part of the water withdrawn as part of the effort to reduce consumption.    

The Pontedera, Baramati and Vinh Phuc plants are located in areas with high water stress (Source: Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas).

It should be noted that the parameters currently used to analyse water entering and leaving the group's plants for the classification of waters in fresh water and other types of water are different from those required by GRI 303-3 and 303-4. Therefore, the tables below show the breakdown by source only.

Water withdrawals

Water withdrawals

Water withdrawal fell considerably on a global scale, due to efficiency measures adopted and to production shutdowns caused by the pandemic.

Piaggio will continue though with targeted activities and controls to further reduce water use, in the belief that minimising this resource is essential.

For all Italian plants, consumption is estimated to be zero as the water withdrawn is returned to the environment after use.

Water consuption

Water consuption

Water discharges

Water discharges

As regards waste water, environmental respect is ensured with processes to treat and purify waste water.

With reference to discharges, a summary of their destination by production site is provided below:

  • Pontedera: in the second half of 2020 a sewage system was completed and put into operation, which collects all the “industrial” discharges, conveying them directly to the chemical-physical purification plant outside the site. The “industrial” network is now completely separate from the civil waste water network. Both types of waste water undergo chemical-physical purification and are then sent for biological treatment, from which they are discharged into the open riverbed. A small part of the discharges, originating from the toilets of two areas of the plant, flows directly into the public sewage network which is directly connected to the biological system of the integrated water supply;
  • Noale: all buildings are connected to the public sewer system; the waste water is of a non-industrial origin only (from toilets and the site canteen);
  • Scorzè: the plant is not served by the public sewer system, so waste water is biologically purified at the site and then conveyed to the local Rio Desolino canal;
  • Mandello del Lario: the plant discharges a part of waste water directly into the public sewer system (non-industrial waste water, canteen waste water, etc.), while waters used in the cooling plants are discharged into the Torrente Valletta stream;
  • Baramati: waste water is treated and reused for internal purposes and irrigation;
  • Vinh Phuc: the site has a chemical/physical purification plant for waste from painting pre-treatment operations before it is conveyed to the public sewer systems, where all other site waste (non-industrial waste) is sent. The final destination is the public sewer system.
  • Commercial companies: water withdrawal, which is only for toilet facilities and comes from the mains, coincides with waste water. The water use of these sites cannot always be recorded, as the sites are sometimes located at property which is not owned, where communal services are shared with other occupants.

Only the Baramati and Vinh Phuc sites reuse some of the water collected. Approximately 104,991 m³ of water were recycled and re-used by the Indian site in 2020, equal to just under 50% of the total amount drawn by the site. At the Vietnamese factory, waste water recovery amounted to 15,960 m³, equal to approximately 16.7%.

 

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